Covid-19 update

Monorail Music is now open Mon-Sat 11am-7pm and on Sunday 12-7pm. We're continuing to follow social distancing rules in accordance with government guidelines. Please continue to wear a face covering where possible.

Thanks for all your support!

Uncle Tupelo: 30th Anniversary Reissues

No Depression is cited as one of the most important albums in the alternative country genre. Due to the impact of the album on alternative country, the term 'No Depression' is sometimes used as a synonym for the genre - especially after a country music magazine named itself after the album. The album helped kick start a revolution which reverberated throughout the American underground. In 1999, Spin Magazine listed the album as one of the Top 90 Albums of the 90s. Its punk attitude, combined with Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy's lyrical depictions of rural, blue-collar life paint grim portraits of Midwestern existence, left a long-lasting legacy. No Depression is now available as limited edition (only 1500 copies) on crystal clear vinyl. Each album is individually numbered and housed in a deluxe heavyweight jacket with special leather-look laminate finish.

Still Feel Gone (1991) is the second album by American alternative country pioneers Uncle Tupelo. While its predecessor No Depression was filled with uptempo tracks, their follow-up effort showcases a band taking a closer look at the middle ground by acoustic guitars. “Still be Around” and “Looking For A Way Out” are great examples of tracks with high-strung acoustic guitars. On this album, Uncle Tupelo sounds even more powerful than before. And the broader picture of the abilities of Farrar, Tweedy, and Heidom confirms a strong combination. This reissue gives the album the special treatment it deserves. Each album in individually numbered and housed in a deluxe heavyweight jacket with special leather-look laminate finish.

March 16-20, 1992 is the third studio album by alternative country band Uncle Tupelo, released in 1992. The title refers to the five-day span during which the album was recorded. An almost entirely acoustic recording, the album features original songs and covers of traditional folk songs in near equal number, and was produced by R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck. With Uncle Tupelo's popularity on the rise, March 16-20, 1992 sold more copies than their first two albums, No Depression and Still Feel Gone, did combined. The album generated positive reviews. Jason Ankeny of Allmusic called the album “a brilliant resurrection of a bygone era of American folk artistry”. Bill Wyman of Entertainment Weekly remarked that it was “a moving and sincere New Depression manifesto”. March 16-20, 1992 is now available as limited edition (only 1500 copies) on crystal clear vinyl. Each album in individually numbered and housed in a deluxe heavyweight jacket with special leather-look laminate finish.