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Alexander Robotnick

Ce N'Est Q'Un Debut

Spittle

Released: 28th May 2021

LP£19.99 Buy Now In Stock. Dispatched today.


Raised from the ashes of eighties new wave (when Materiali Sonori debuted the Fuzz Dance series), Problemes D’Amour soon began a disco and electro classic all over the place. Florence born producer and musician Maurizio Dami - with co-conspirators Giampiero Bigazzi, Arlo Bigazzi and Marzio Benelli – created a mysterious character, a so called “modular structure born out a soviet calculator and promptly runaway". He was singing in french and was supported by primordial digital machine, using at the same time the more classical electric guitars, sax and sensual female voices. A handful of evergreen are still played all over the world by many international deejays, while “Problemes d’Amour” was even featured on influential Strut compilation Disco Not Disco 2. American label Sire (home of Talking Heads and a young Madonna) published a Fuzz Dance Ep in 1985 with the Robotnick masterpiece and several contribution from Mya & The Mirror, Gina & The Flexix and Naïf Orchestra. Maurizio Dami is still performing worldwide as a dj and is still composing new music. After 40 years Spittle Records in joint venture with Materiali Sonori re-issues the mini album and the 12” with its original artwork.

"Once I was in Chicago, it was around 2010, I was just finishing my set and went outside the club to light a cigarette. Suddenly a police car stops nearby. I thought the policeman was here to fine me (I was more than 20 meters outside the venue), but he just lifted a poster of mine and asked to sign it. Then I realized that "Problèmes d’Amour" has been for a longtime the opening theme for a popular radio broadcast well-known between the black community (hence the policeman was black)”.
Maurizio Dami